Mercedes-Benz prepares to go all-electric

Photo: courtesy Mercedes-Benz/Newspress USA

Mercedes-Benz is getting ready to go all electric by the end of the decade, where market conditions allow.

Shifting from electric-first to electric-only, the company is accelerating toward an emissions-free and software-driven future.

By 2022, Mercedes-Benz will have battery electric vehicles (BEV) in all segments the company serves.

From 2025 onwards, all newly launched vehicle architectures will be electric-only and customers will be able to choose an all-electric alternative for every model the company makes.

As soon as 2022, eight Mercedes-Benz electric vehicles will be produced at seven locations on three continents. Furthermore, all passenger car and battery assembly sites run by Mercedes-Benz AG will switch to carbon neutral production by 2022.

“The EV shift is picking up speed—especially in the luxury segment, where Mercedes-Benz belongs. The tipping point is getting closer and we will be ready as markets switch to electric-only by the end of this decade,” said Ola Källenius, CEO of Daimler AG and Mercedes-Benz AG.

The company is also working on setting new standards in charging: “Plug & Charge” will allow customers to plug-in, charge and unplug without extra steps needed for authentication and payment processing. Plug & Charge will go live with the market launch of the EQS later this year.

Mercedes me Charge is already one of the world’s largest charging networks and currently comprises more than 530,000 AC and DC charging points worldwide. Furthermore, Mercedes-Benz is working with Shell on expanding the charging network. Customers will get enhanced access to Shell’s Recharge network consisting of more than 30,000 charge points by 2025 in North America, Europe, and China—including more than 10,000 high-power chargers globally.

Mercedes-Benz is also developing the Vision EQXX, an electric car with a real world range of more than 1,000 kilometers (621 miles), targeting a single-digit figure for Kwh per 100 kilometers (over 6 miles per Kwh) at normal highway driving speeds.